The Cracked Spine

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cinderellainrubbershoes:

thinkingisdangerous:

cinderellainrubbershoes:

AN UNDERESTIMATED FORMAT.
Some “serious” readers tend to avoid graphic novels like the plague because they think it’s all made up of immature stuff. I’ve asked someone before why he wouldn’t read one, and he answered something along the lines of “Those are only created for kids who have short attention spans; the cheap pictures are a magnet to keep them reading.” Really? You think the pictures are nothing but an eye-candy—’cheap’ ones at that? Kind of mentality is that?
Graphic novels are products of a good mix of literature and art. The artwork that comes in the package is never just for decoration; it’s doing half the legwork of the whole mechanism. I mean, everyone has heard of “a picture paints a thousand words” saying, right? For one, panels can effectively help the story pick up speed or slow down when it needs to—with just the fewest of words. Just a few frames, a clever usage of onomatopeia, a couple or so of thought balloons, and voila! The readers are in for a good-paced story. Having encountered many books, I know that pacing is still a hard work for most novelists. I could point out more use of the art, but I’d rather let the others discover it by reading something in this format.
I only wish that more people would read graphic novels—I bet they’d be surprised by the ample amount of philosophy, wisdom, and heart-pinching epiphanies that these books could give. If only they’d drop the mentality that penciled characters talking in speech balloons should never be taken seriously, it would all be easier for everyone. Aye?

Do people seriously think that? My god, Watchmen and V for Vendetta are amazing. I actually struggled with Watchmen at first - proves it’s not just a bunch of easy reading.

Oh they do! Especially older readers. They’re afraid of being looked down on because they’re reading ‘comics’. Tsk tsk. And also, I have a similar experience with Watchmen, but in the end I really loved it. It’s up in my top-graphic-novels list right now—Alan Moore is such a genius. :)

 I’ve commented on this as well. As a children’s librarian, this is a battle that comes up regularly with parents of reluctant readers. They rarely realize how important graphic novels are to literacy. At my library, we let kids read graphic novels for their summer reading logs and yet some parents are appalled, frustrated, and disillusioned about how their kids only read “that garbage”. It’s high time to educate people about the value of these gems.

cinderellainrubbershoes:

thinkingisdangerous:

cinderellainrubbershoes:

AN UNDERESTIMATED FORMAT.

Some “serious” readers tend to avoid graphic novels like the plague because they think it’s all made up of immature stuff. I’ve asked someone before why he wouldn’t read one, and he answered something along the lines of “Those are only created for kids who have short attention spans; the cheap pictures are a magnet to keep them reading.” Really? You think the pictures are nothing but an eye-candy—’cheap’ ones at that? Kind of mentality is that?

Graphic novels are products of a good mix of literature and art. The artwork that comes in the package is never just for decoration; it’s doing half the legwork of the whole mechanism. I mean, everyone has heard of “a picture paints a thousand words” saying, right? For one, panels can effectively help the story pick up speed or slow down when it needs to—with just the fewest of words. Just a few frames, a clever usage of onomatopeia, a couple or so of thought balloons, and voila! The readers are in for a good-paced story. Having encountered many books, I know that pacing is still a hard work for most novelists. I could point out more use of the art, but I’d rather let the others discover it by reading something in this format.

I only wish that more people would read graphic novels—I bet they’d be surprised by the ample amount of philosophy, wisdom, and heart-pinching epiphanies that these books could give. If only they’d drop the mentality that penciled characters talking in speech balloons should never be taken seriously, it would all be easier for everyone. Aye?

Do people seriously think that? My god, Watchmen and V for Vendetta are amazing. I actually struggled with Watchmen at first - proves it’s not just a bunch of easy reading.

Oh they do! Especially older readers. They’re afraid of being looked down on because they’re reading ‘comics’. Tsk tsk. And also, I have a similar experience with Watchmen, but in the end I really loved it. It’s up in my top-graphic-novels list right now—Alan Moore is such a genius. :)

 I’ve commented on this as well. As a children’s librarian, this is a battle that comes up regularly with parents of reluctant readers. They rarely realize how important graphic novels are to literacy. At my library, we let kids read graphic novels for their summer reading logs and yet some parents are appalled, frustrated, and disillusioned about how their kids only read “that garbage”. It’s high time to educate people about the value of these gems.

Filed under graphic novels

7 notes

Anne Blythe is sick of relationships not working out. She is ready to give up on the whole love thing when she stumbles upon a business card for what seems to be a dating service. She decides to give love one more chance, but soon finds out that the service is actually a pricey — and exclusive — arranged marriage service. What does she have to lose (other than a vast sum of money)? Will Anne’s new approach secure her a happy future, or is there more to this arranged marriage service than meets the eye? This is a fun, breezy read that deals with an original subject in an eye-opening manner. I couldn’t put it down. 4/5

Anne Blythe is sick of relationships not working out. She is ready to give up on the whole love thing when she stumbles upon a business card for what seems to be a dating service. She decides to give love one more chance, but soon finds out that the service is actually a pricey — and exclusive — arranged marriage service. What does she have to lose (other than a vast sum of money)? Will Anne’s new approach secure her a happy future, or is there more to this arranged marriage service than meets the eye? This is a fun, breezy read that deals with an original subject in an eye-opening manner. I couldn’t put it down. 4/5

Filed under chick lit fiction

2 notes

This is a marvellous little book! Though it is marketed to children, it should be read by all dog lovers. Earl can’t stop his tail from wagging. Why does Earl wag his tail all the time (*fwip* *fwip*)? A delightfully lighthearted look at the simple (and not-so-simple) things in life from a dog’s point of view. Two paws up! 5/5

This is a marvellous little book! Though it is marketed to children, it should be read by all dog lovers. Earl can’t stop his tail from wagging. Why does Earl wag his tail all the time (*fwip* *fwip*)? A delightfully lighthearted look at the simple (and not-so-simple) things in life from a dog’s point of view. Two paws up! 5/5

Filed under children's books picture books dogs

1 note

Adoption books?

Does anybody know if there are any good picture books about adoption that are NOT international in focus? (e.g. you were adopted from China/Korea/Japan/Far Away)

A patron asked me for something like this this afternoon and I could not find anything that wasn’t international in scope. While international adoption is a wonderful thing, local adoption is great, too.

1 note

After The Hunger Games and Catching Fire, this book was a big disappointement. I spent weeks reading it, ever tempted to put it back on the shelf, classified as a lost hope. I did slog through it, and though it did pick up steam 3/4 of the way through the book, I think that Suzanne Collins could have done much better than this mediocre and often pointless conclusion to the Hunger Games trilogy.
Why did so many beloved characters have to die? Why did so many one- and two-dimensional new characters have to be introduced in rapid succession, only to be killed off? Any why, oh why, did Katniss, the beloved main character of this trilogy have to be so wishy-washy? Certainly, in the first two books she was not at all in charge of her own fate. In this book, she was an icon to the people of Panem. Why did she not once stand up for herself and do what she believed was right?
I will continue to highly recommend The Hunger Games as a fantastic piece of post-apololyptic, dystopian YA fiction. The first book stands alone as a true masterpiece. The second is a welcome epilogue to the first book, but the first book stands on its own without it. The third seems rushed and poorly thought out. A big disappointment that seems to run out of momentum before it even begins.
2/5

After The Hunger Games and Catching Fire, this book was a big disappointement. I spent weeks reading it, ever tempted to put it back on the shelf, classified as a lost hope. I did slog through it, and though it did pick up steam 3/4 of the way through the book, I think that Suzanne Collins could have done much better than this mediocre and often pointless conclusion to the Hunger Games trilogy.

Why did so many beloved characters have to die? Why did so many one- and two-dimensional new characters have to be introduced in rapid succession, only to be killed off? Any why, oh why, did Katniss, the beloved main character of this trilogy have to be so wishy-washy? Certainly, in the first two books she was not at all in charge of her own fate. In this book, she was an icon to the people of Panem. Why did she not once stand up for herself and do what she believed was right?

I will continue to highly recommend The Hunger Games as a fantastic piece of post-apololyptic, dystopian YA fiction. The first book stands alone as a true masterpiece. The second is a welcome epilogue to the first book, but the first book stands on its own without it. The third seems rushed and poorly thought out. A big disappointment that seems to run out of momentum before it even begins.

2/5

Filed under book reviews mockingjay

0 notes

If you have not yet discovered this book, you probably should, especially if you enjoy simple pleasures like whiffs of bakery air and popping bubble wrap. Plus, it’s riotously funny. In a word, it’s AWESOME!

If you have not yet discovered this book, you probably should, especially if you enjoy simple pleasures like whiffs of bakery air and popping bubble wrap. Plus, it’s riotously funny. In a word, it’s AWESOME!

Filed under book reviews